Kate Scott - Artists Statement 2021 
Kate studied Fine Art Painting BA in London and went on to an MA in printmaking in Brighton. She worked from various studios in London after graduating, but now has a studio at home in Hove. Kate’s work concerns the relationship between what is seen and what is felt, the conscious and the unconscious, she seeks to explore and crystallize the intangible sense of a particular place, and how it feels to be there, emotionally and physically, be it landscape or an interior space, listening music can be a catalyst in the process.
Kate experiences the physical act of painting like a conversation in which using mark making, and layers of colour, she taps into the silent voice that cannot be communicated any other way, when the conversation finishes the painting becomes something separate, and can appear to be a window to another world, which then reflects the experience of the viewer.
Her work varies in size from very small mixed media pieces on paper to large acrylic paintings on Canvas.


Email: Kate Scott 


Website: Kate Scott Paintings


Jo Delafons

Jo Delafons

Artist Statement



Jo Delafons’ mixed media works evoke a strong sense of place and are imbued with a subtle emotional charge. She has developed a deep connection with the landscape around Shoreham by Sea , where she lives and has her studio. She left London, and a demanding teaching career, to focus on her own work and lead a more balanced life. Walking became a passion, and a lifeline during lockdown, leading to a recent series of ‘Lockdown Walk Boxes’ . An essence of the shoreline, riverbank and south downs is distilled within her practice and materials collected on her walks are frequently incorporated.  The symbolism of safe passage through stormy waters resonates. Ships feature heavily in her work-  navigating life’s turbulence to calmer waters and clusters of small boats reference the strong sense of community she feels here. Some works appear to rise up and are held gently aloft in space. Others teeter precariously, or appear tossed about, suggesting darker, more elemental forces at play.  She avoids  solidity, preferring to break forms up to let space and light through. The delicate build and sometimes perilous balance of her works hints at the fragile nature of life itself and our destructive relationship with nature.  The viewer is left with the suggestion that things are not quite on solid ground. Indeed, perhaps now, more than ever, we are all at sea.